Posts for category: Foot Condition

By Total Foot and Ankle of Tampa Bay
December 07, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Sesamoid   Sesamoiditis  

What is Sesamoiditis?

Sesamoids are small bones that are only connected to tendons or surrounded in muscle. This only appears in a few places in the body, one of which is the foot. Two very tiny sesamoids are found in the underside of the foot near the big toe. One is on the outer side of the foot and the other bone is close to the middle of the foot. This structure provides a smooth surface for the tendons to slide over, which helps the tendons move muscles. They help with weight bearing and also help to elevate the bones of the big toe. So now that you know what sesamoids are, you might be wondering what sesamoiditis is and what its symptoms are.

Sesamoiditis

Just like any other bone, sesamoids can unfortunately fracture. The tendons surrounding the sesamoids may also become irritated or inflamed and this is what sesamoiditis is. Sesamoiditis is also a form of tendonitis and is a common condition among ballerinas, runners, and baseball catchers due to the pressure that is constantly placed on their feet.

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis

Symptoms of Sesamoiditis may include:

  • Pain under the big toe or ball of the foot
  • Swelling and/or bruising
  • Difficulty in bending and straightening the big toe

Treating Sesamoiditis

Treatments include:

  • Resting and stopping any activity that could be causing pain and inflammation
  • Anti-inflammatories, such as ibuprofen and aspirin only after consulting your physician
  • Icing the sole of the foot
  • Wearing soft-soled and low-heeled shoes
  • Cushioning inserts in the shoes

If symptoms persist after treatments, you may need to wear a removable brace for 4-6 weeks to help the bones heal. Call your podiatrist today to ask any questions about sesamoiditis and get on your way to pain-free feet once again!

By Total Foot and Ankle of Tampa Bay
August 16, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Poor Circulation  

Are you experiencing numbness, tingling, or discolorations in your feet?

Even though poor circulation isn’t a condition, if you are experiencing poor circulation in your feet this is often a symptom of a much larger issue. This is why it’s important to understand the warning signs of poor circulation and when to see a podiatrist, as many of these conditions can be serious or cause further complications to your health.

Causes of Poor Circulation

There are many reasons why someone may have poor circulation. The most common conditions include:

1. Peripheral artery disease (PAD)

This causes poor circulation in the legs due to a narrowing in the arteries and blood vessels. Over time this condition can cause damage to nerves or tissue. While this condition can occur in younger people, particularly smokers, it’s more common for people over 50 years old to develop PAD.

2. Blood Clots

A blood clot causes a block or restriction in blood flow and can develop anywhere in the body. The most common places for a blood clot include the arms or the legs, which can lead to symptoms of poor circulation. In some cases, a blood clot can cause serious complications such as a stroke.

3. Diabetes

While this condition does affect blood sugar levels, it is also known to affect circulation within the body. Those with circulation issues may experience cramping in the legs that may get worse when you are active. Those with diabetic neuropathy may experience nerve damage in the legs and feet, as well as numbness or tingling.

4. Raynaud’s Disease

A less common condition, Raynaud’s disease causes chronic cold fingers and feet due to the narrowing of the arteries in the hands and toes. Since these arteries are narrow it’s more difficult for blood to flow to these areas, leading to poor circulation. Of course, you may experience these symptoms in other parts of the body besides your toes or fingers, such as your nose, ears, or lips.

Warning Signs of Poor Circulation

You may be experiencing poor circulation in your feet if you are experiencing these symptoms:

  • Numbness
  • Pain that may radiate into the limbs
  • Tingling (a “pins and needles” sensation)
  • Muscle cramping

If you are experiencing symptoms of poor circulation that don’t go away it’s best to play it safe rather than sorry and turn to a podiatric specialist who can provide a proper diagnosis and determine the best approach for improving circulation. Don’t ignore this issue.

By Total Foot and Ankle of Tampa Bay
July 06, 2018
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Hammertoes  

When most people think about foot deformities they most often think about bunions; however, hammertoes are just as common. This unassuming deformity comes about gradually, so you may not even notice it until it’s too late. “What is a hammertoe?” You might be wondering. A hammertoe affects the middle joint of a toe (often the smaller toes), causing the toe to bend downward. In severe cases, a hammertoe will look almost claw-like.

There are two kinds of hammertoes: flexible and rigid. As you might imagine, a flexible hammertoe is one in which you can still straighten the toe out. If you aren’t able to straighten the affected toe then this is a rigid hammertoe. A flexible hammertoe isn’t as serious as a rigid one; however, it’s important that you take care of your hammertoe to make sure that it doesn’t get worse.

While there is no way to cure a hammertoe there are simple measures you can take to prevent it from progressing. First and foremost, you need to take a look at the shoes you are wearing and make sure that they aren’t too tight. When you slip your feet into your shoes, does it cause your toes to bunch up against one another? If so then this could make your hammertoe worse.

Instead, opt for shoes with an ample toe box, which will allow your toes to wiggle and move around freely. If you have a structural imbalance within the foot this can leave you prone to foot problems such as hammertoes and bunions. To correct this imbalance, talk to your foot doctor about getting custom orthotics (shoe inserts), which can be placed into your shoes to help provide cushioning, support, and shock absorption for your feet.

If pain or stiffness does rear its ugly head you can choose to take an over-the-counter pain reliever like ibuprofen, which can tackle both pain and inflammation in one fell swoop, or you can place a towel-wrapped ice pack (never put ice directly on the skin, as it can cause severe burns) over the area for several minutes.

Just as you can buy pads to cover a bunion or callus, you can also buy a non-medicated protective pad to cover over a hammertoe. Since the deformed toe joint juts out this can leave the toe prone to calluses, which can cause pain when wearing shoes. To prevent a callus from forming, you can apply a protective pad over the deformed toe joint before putting on shoes.

Of course, if you are dealing with significant or frequent pain, or if the hammertoe is rigid, then you will want to turn to a podiatric specialist. In severe cases, surgery may be recommended to correct the disfigured joint.

By Total Foot and Ankle of Tampa Bay
December 27, 2017
Category: Foot Condition

Could your heel pain be due to plantar fasciitis? Find out now from your Wesley Chapel, FL podiatrist!

Are you currently dealing with heel pain? If your Wesley Chapel, FL podiatrist has told you that you are suffering from plantar fasciitis isn’t it time you found out more about this condition and what you can do to eliminate your symptoms?

Q. What is plantar fasciitis?Heel Pain

A. This foot problem is one of the most common causes of heel pain and occurs when the thick band of tissue, known as the plantar fascia, become inflamed. The plantar fascia connects the heel bone to your toes and also provides support for the arches of your feet.

Q. What causes this inflammatory condition?

A. While you may not know exactly what’s caused your plantar fasciitis, your foot doctor may be able to pinpoint the direct cause. Plantar fasciitis usually appears when someone has changed their physical activity. So, instead of running five miles you may decide you suddenly want to run 10 miles. Or perhaps you’re used to a low-impact elliptical but decided to change up your routine and start running on the beach. Any sudden and drastic change either to the duration or intensity of your physical routine can sometimes lead to plantar fasciitis.

Q. What are the symptoms?

A. The most common symptom of plantar fasciitis is heel pain. The pain is persistent but may wax and wane throughout the day. You may notice the most severe pain happening in the morning when you first start moving around. Over time the pain may lessen, but become exacerbated when standing for long periods of time or getting up after sitting for a while.

Besides pain, those with plantar fasciitis may also notice swelling, stiffness and limited range-of-motion and mobility due to the discomfort.

Q. How is plantar fasciitis treated?

A. You’ll be happy to hear that this condition usually goes away on its own with time. Of course, there are certain things you can do to help provide some much-needed relief. Here are some of the best ways to handle your plantar fasciitis:

 

  • Rest: Try to stay off your feet as much as possible. Avoid high-impact activities and if you really need to workout, then you’ll want to change your routine to only include low-impact exercises.
  • Wear the proper shoes: It’s also believed that some people develop plantar fasciitis because the shoes they were wearing didn’t provide the proper support and stability needed. Remember that your workout shoes need to be replaced about at least once a year.
  • Stretching and strengthening exercises: There are some exercises you can incorporate into your daily routine to help provide some relief from your plantar fasciitis symptoms. Talk to your podiatrist about which exercises can help reduce your pain and improve mobility.
  • Orthotics: Sometimes your foot doctor can prescribe orthotics to provide additional shoe support and stability to eliminate your plantar fasciitis. We would be happy to help you determine which kind of orthotics is right for you.
 
Contact your Wesley Chapel, FL podiatrist

 

Your Wesley Chapel, FL podiatrist is always here to provide the care and treatment you need to get back on your feet again and pain-free. Turn to us for all of your foot-care needs.

By Total Foot and Ankle of Tampa Bay
September 18, 2017
Category: Foot Condition
Tags: Foot Pain   Turf Toe  

Turf toe is a sprain of the joint just below the big toe, also known as the first metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. This foot injury is particularly common among athletes who play on artificial turf, hence the name “turf” toe. When athletes play sports on turf or other hard surfaces, the foot can stick to the ground, resulting in jamming of the big toe joint.

Typically the injury is sudden, but it can also occur after sustaining multiple injuries, such as pushing off repeatedly when running or jumping. Although it’s a condition most commonly associated with dancers, soccer players, wrestlers, gymnasts and football players, you don’t have to be an athlete to get it.

Symptoms of turf toe range from mild to severe, and may gradually worsen with continued movement. The most common symptoms of turf toe include:

  • Swelling and pain at the joint of the big toe

  • Pain and tenderness when bending the toe

  • Stiffness and limited movement of the big toe joint

If your symptoms are indicative of turf toe, then you may be able to relieve the pain and swelling with the following self-treatment, including:

  • Ice the injury

  • Apply a compression bandage

  • Rest and temporarily discontinue any physical activity

  • Wear a brace to protect the toe and to limit bending

For more severe cases of turf toe, visit our office for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. A podiatrist can easily diagnose turf toe through an evaluation that includes a range of motion and joint stability tests.

Professional treatment may include exercises to strengthen the toe, modified footwear or splinting. With proper treatment, you can eliminate pain resulting from turf toe and return to your favorite sport or activity!



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Zephyrhills Office
Zephyrhills Podiatry
6326 Fort King Road
Zephyrhills, FL 33542
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Total Foot & Ankle of Tampa Bay
936 Cypress Village Blvd. Suite B
Sun City Center, FL 33573
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Wesley Chapel Office
Florida Hospital Wesley Chapel
2649 Windguard Circle Unit 101
Wesley Chapel, FL 33544
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Apollo Beach/Riverview Office
Baycare Outpatient Center
10141 Big Bend Road, Suite 207
Riverview, FL 33578
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